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10 Places to Find Virtual Assistant Clients

Are you still struggling to find clients for your VA business?

When we start our Virtual Assistant business, we all have the same vision – working on our own schedule, clients calling with work they need done, and money coming in easily.

After a while that shine goes away and we realize that it’s much harder than we thought it was going to be to find those wonderful clients.

But it doesn’t have to be!

If you are struggling, you need to look at what you are doing to find and sign clients.

Tracey D'Aviero

The first thing you need to identify is where you are looking for clients.

Here are 10 places you can find potential clients to connect with:

1. Facebook

You can find clients in Facebook groups (go and join the entrepreneur groups, not the VA groups!). Start or join conversations with people who are talking about what kind of support they need.

2. LinkedIn

Use the search function in LinkedIn to find people who might be able to use your services. Choose an industry to target and do some outreach to active LinkedIn users.

3. Your phone or email address book

You know more people than you think you do. Go through your phone or email address book (or your Facebook friends!) and look for people who could potentially be your clients, or who might know someone who could use your services.

4. Bulletin boards

Locally small business owners use bulletin boards in public places to post their business card. Find and connect with these people on social media and start to build a relationship to see if they need your support.

5. Referrals

Ask your family and friends if they know anyone that might need your services. You have to be very clear on what you offer and who you can best support, but once you know that, it’s easy to ask for referrals.

6. Former employers or clients

Reach out to people you have worked with before to see if they need any help, or if they know anyone who does. Also see if you can get a testimonial from them if you haven’t yet, to put on your LinkedIn profile or website.

7. Email list

If you aren’t building an email list yet, you need to start. These are people who are interested in what you have to offer – and they will be your warmest audience for prospects.

8. Networking event

Attend a local or virtual networking event to connect with people who are looking to connect with other business owners. Remember every small business owner needs support – get out there so they can see you are there to help!

9. Professional associations or organizations

Join your local chamber of commerce or business group where entrepreneurs are connecting. Surrounding yourself with people who are looking to grow their business is an excellent way to find people who will need to outsource work to a VA.

10. Job boards

Of course job boards are a great place to look for clients. These are people who are looking for help right now. It is important to be able to respond quickly, so be sure to have a draft proposal ready to fill in with their requirements to increase your chances of getting an interview.

Clients are everywhere. These are just 10 places to look.

The key is to be looking every day, and to not just be asking people if they need your help, but to be building relationships with communities of people so that they see your expertise.

Once you get talking to people daily about what they need help with and how you might be able to help them, it’s time to invite them to a sales conversation (don’t do this in your first interaction, please!). I’ve recorded a video on my Youtube channel to talk about how to handle that sales conversation. Watch it here!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here.

Calculating Your VA Rates Properly is Critical To Your Success

Do you know how much you need to charge to keep your VA business operational, profitable and sustainable? If you haven’t taken the time to do the math yet, it’s time!

If you are working with clients right now but you are still struggling with making money, you need to look at what you are charging clients.

I was extremely discouraged this week to witness a conversation taking place in a VA group.

A VA reached out for some advice around what she called logistics.

She has two clients that she is working for 20 hours a week each – a total of 40 billable hours a week. Great, eh? I think that’s wonderful to have a full VA business with just two clients!

Her concern was that she didn’t have time to add another 20 hour/week client, but she needs to because the 2 current clients are not earning her enough to pay her bills.

The logical answer for this response is that her rates are too low and she needs to raise them. If you are billing 40 hours a week and you can not pay your bills, it’s completely obvious (to me) that you are not charging what you need to charge.

She said that she was charging the going rate for VA work in her area, because her clients would not pay more (and yes, her rate is MUCH too low to operate a business).

Some VAs stated that perhaps her bills were too high (not that her rates are too low). Ummm … here’s the thing … if you know how much you need to earn in your business, then you must set your billable rate accordingly.

You can’t just pick a number out of the air.

You can’t just work for whatever a client says they will pay you.

And you can’t work 60 hours a week just to make ends meet.

If you are running a business, you get to make the decision about how much you charge.

I was not discouraged by her request for advice. I was discouraged by the fact that she thought that the answer was to add another client.

And don’t get me wrong, I am not criticizing this VA at all. She is absolutely not the only one with this mindset. I am so happy that she reached out to get advice, because many VAs just never do.

I was also annoyed by the absolutely awful advice she was getting from the other VAs in the group – to get subcontractors. When you can not pay your own bills, you NEVER bring someone else in to your business.

And if your rate is too low to begin with, you can NOT pay someone else even less per hour to do the same work.

The only logical solution in this situation is to raise your rates.

Yes, that might mean that you lose clients. But you will burn out and lose your business entirely if you don’t.

Clients are everywhere. We are virtual – we do not have to settle for clients who do not see our value, or who tell us what they will pay us.

Clients are allowed to have a budget, of course, but it is NOT their right to tell us what we can charge. They can only tell us if they agree to pay it.

Calculating what you need to charge to make your business sustainable is your right as a business owner.

In fact, it’s your responsibility as a business owner.

Do it properly, and then craft service offerings that provide value and support for your clients.

Then go out and find those clients. I promise you they are out there, and you and your business will be in better shape because of the math you do!

If you need to figure out how much your billable rate should be, download my free Rate Calculation Package and figure it out! It will show you the variety of ways you can bring revenue into your VA business so you can make sure you are charging the right amount starting now!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here.

How I Landed My First VA Client

If you are still struggling to get that first Virtual Assistant client (or that first great client), this is what you need to do.

One of the things many Virtual Assistants struggle with is getting their first client.

There is so much anxiety around getting clients – especially that first one – that we can often be overcome and get paralyzed. And nothing happens.

We try to adjust our services. We try to adjust our rates. We apply for countless RFPs and hear nothing back.

Or worse yet, we take any work someone offers us because we don’t want to miss out on money – and we hate it.

The one thing that VAs who are struggling to get great clients are usually not doing … is having conversations.

Actually talking to people is what will get you clients.

It’s how I got my first client. And the one after that. And the one after that. And pretty much every client I ever got.

How I Got My First Virtual Assistant Client

When I was 7 months pregnant I was leaving my regular job. I knew I wasn’t going back because I lived outside the city and I didn’t want to pay for daycare and basically have my whole paycheque going to that and the gas for the commute.

My boss asked me when I could start working again, because the financial work I did was really important to him. He used to do it before I did, and he had only trained me. He knew I had the expertise and it would be easier to have me just do that work (and split up the rest of my job tasks to someone else) – and it gave me the opportunity to earn enough money each month to stay home and still contribute to my household.

A conversation about my boss’s needs and my needs got me my first client.

When I realized a bunch of years later that I was actually a VA, I joined CAVA and I got my ‘next’ first client by responding to an RFP. She was an editor in New York City who I signed after a GREAT conversation, and we worked together until I stopped doing VA work in 2018. She also sent me countless referrals over the years and became a great friend.

When I took my Virtual Events certification through VAClassroom (now FreelanceU), I started talking to my audience and connections about my new services – and I got another ‘first’ client. My first telesummit, that turned into another, that turned me into ‘Telesummit Girl’.

You see?

You will always be looking for a ‘first’ client of some kind.

Many of you are still looking for that actual ‘first’ client.

You need to speak to people in order for it to happen.

You will never know what clients need until you talk to them. Some of them you will be able to help, and some of them you will not be able to help. But then you just keep moving along to another conversation. The numbers are on your side.

The clients WILL come when you are talking to people about how you can help them.

And you will never get better at conversations until you start doing them.

I challenge you to make a list of people that can reach out to, to have conversations about supporting them. And then start reaching out to them. Build relationships daily. It is a great skill to build as a business owner, and one that not many VAs are using. Make it work for you!

To get more tips on networking to find clients, check out my free training videos on Youtube.

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

Just One Hour Can Make a Difference in Your VA Business

It is often said that time is a non-renewable resource, especially in your Virtual Assistant business where time is money.

If you waste an hour - whether it's an hour a day, a week or a month, you could be wasting valuable time.

Many VAs bill their clients by the hour, so it stands to reason that they are hyper-aware of time - but are still not always able to control it well.

When we don't have a lot of clients, we waste time doing research and setting up our website ... usually more time than we need to.

When we do get clients coming in, we often run from client task to client task and don't pay much attention to our own admin or marketing tasks.

What if I told you an hour can make a difference in your business?

It's true.

When you get really clear on what you need to get done - and you focus on just that, you can actually stretch that hour of time into what seems like a lot longer period of time.

Here are a few ways an hour can make a difference in your VA business:

One Hour a Day

I recently attend an event where Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup for the Soul, The Success Principles) was speaking. He shared one of his daily routines - he spends 20 minutes a day reading, 20 minutes a day meditating, and 20 minutes a day exercising. That's an hour. You may not think you have a spare hour, but if you realize that he says his best ideas come when he quiets his mind, the you realize what great advice this is. If you can find 20 minutes a day for each of these activities (and really, who can't?), you can set yourself up for Jack Canfield kind of success.

One Hour a Week

I am reading a book called Clockwork by Mike Michalowicz as part of my business book club. It is about how to put your business on autopilot (so to speak). There is a big framework, of course, but one of the most important pieces of information I have gotten from this book is to spend an hour a week 'designing' your business. That means looking at your numbers, considering your goals, and analyzing your strategies. Many VAs never do this, but it is so valuable. You want to make sure that everything you are doing is leading you towards your goals. Focusing on the design for just one hour every week is an excellent way to keep on top of your goals.

One Hour Whenever You Need It

I often tell this story about my cousin Justin. He gave me some of the best business advice I've ever heard (and he hates it when I credit him, but I do anyway). He told me once that if you feel like you are overwhelmed and too busy, take an hour and spend it in your project management system. Look for things that can be done more efficiently, delegated, removed completely, or completed quickly. When you have too much to do the sense is to run from one thing to another but it's much more effective to take another look at what you have on your list. It works, I tell ya! I do it all the time. Try it.

An hour is an important increment of time to Virtual Assistants. Many of us bill our clients hourly.

But don't forget about your own business. It's important to make sure that you are taking good care of yourself, and your plans.

Whether you take an hour right now, every day, or every week, you'll be heading in the right direction!

For more tips on time management, check out my free VA training videos on Youtube. There are more than 50 free videos there for you!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

3 Things You Must Know Before You Create Virtual Assistant Packages

If you don’t have a few things in place before creating packages for your VA services, you will have trouble developing packages that work for you.

I hear Virtual Assistants talk a lot about creating packages in the VA groups and forums. But there is often confusion around what that actually means.

The first thing you should consider is why you want to create a package to begin with.

If you think it’s because you can make more money than charging hourly, you are not technically wrong, but that’s not really the best reason to create packages.

The way to make more money in your VA business is to get better at delivering awesome services to your clients, so you can get more work from your existing clients, and you can get more clients, period.

But packaging your services is a great way to do a few things, such as:

  • Control the profit in your business by setting rates that are fixed, with profit included
  • Avoid scope creep by defining exactly what it is you do for your clients
  • Clearly communicate to your clients what you will do for them, and how much it will cost them
  • Earn more money per hour by getting faster / better / more efficient – instead of less money because you stop billing by the hour.

Packaging your services takes a lot of grunt work to begin with (if you do it correctly!), but it can be  a great way to start to build and grow your business.

You must know (or have) 3 things before you offer your clients package pricing:

  1. A complete list of services you will provide for your clients.
  2. Procedures for each task that is included in those service offerings.
  3. An accurate estimate of time that it takes you to do each task.

Talk about grunt work!

If you don’t have these things in place right now, the you are not ready to create service packages.

But the good news is, you can start getting these things ready right away – by tackling one task at a time, you can start to create the list and the procedures, and add to it every time you do something new.

List of Services

To put together a package for your clients, you have to define specifically what you are going to do for them. This is usually a combination of things that go together, usually by category (ie communication,  or marketing tasks) or by specific task (ie client care – handling contracts, payments, emails, scheduling, etc).

Do it now: Start to make your list. You must define exactly what you can do for clients, before you can build a package from it.

Procedures

Yes, this is the grunt work! But really it’s just writing down what you do and when you do it. Doing a newsletter for someone in Mailchimp? Write down the steps to do it. Step 1, Step 2, Step 3. Don’t leave anything out. Procedure documents help you to free up brain space when you go back to do a task a second time – to make sure that you do it the same way, every time, and that you don’t leave out any steps. Procedures are very important when you are bringing in subcontractors – and if you business grows quickly, you won’t have time to do it then.

Do it now: Start with the next task you complete. One at a time – slow and steady wins the race! You’ll be surprised how much brain space you free up, and also you can build a procedures file pretty quickly!

Time It All

The most important part of creating packages is to get the pricing right. To do that, you must calculate the time it takes you to do every single task in your business. That sounds daunting I know, and it should be! You probably do a lot! But it’s essential. So take those procedure documents and add up the time it takes you to do each step, to get your billable task time. It’s also a good idea to add in 20-25% of extra time to allow for tech issues, or other problems. Speed is not the key – consistency is!

Do it now: Time out everything you do. Be sure to eliminate distractions when you work so that you are focused on the task at hand. Multiply your time for each task by your billable rate to get your ‘per task rate’.

Creating packages is a great way to grow your VA business and provide clear services to your clients for a fixed amount.

Everyone loves clarity, and packages – done right – gives both of you that clarity.

If you want a more indepth lesson on creating packages, have a look at my self study lesson How to Package Your Virtual Assistant Services. It walks you through the entire process so you can get your packages created and start making more money today!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

5 Important Reasons to Document Your Business Procedures

Creating business procedures for your Virtual Assistant business helps you with more than just productivity.

"The only difference between a mob and a trained army is organization." - Calvin Coolidge

When I work with Virtual Assistants to help them make their business better, we often talk about developing standard operating procedures.

Many VAs don’t have something like this in their business. They often feel that if they are the only one doing things that it’s not necessary.

But I’ve got 5 reasons  that might change your mind!

1. Speeds Up Your Work

Writing out a procedure for how you do something might seem mundane if it’s something you know how to do, but it can actually help you get faster at completing that task. When you have to use brain space to think about what to do next, it can slow you down.

Okay, so it probably won’t take you an extra hour to do something without a procedure, but if you have even been distracted by something while you are mid-task, I bet you could be well served by having that process documented so you could just jump back into the step where you left off. Try it – you will be surprised!

2. Sets Standards In Your Business

Documenting what you do sets the standard for how you want it done in your business. Taking the time to write the steps out one by one when you do something the ‘right’ way ensures that you will not cut corners on the task.

Setting standards is a very professional thing to do and can set you apart from your VA colleagues. You can assure your clients that you take their work seriously and that everything will be done the same way, every time.

It’s like using a recipe when you cook. To make it the exact same way every time, you follow the recipe to a T (except for pasta dough and some bread, which depend on room humidity, but that’s another article). 😊

3. Determines Billable Time

When you have the detailed actions steps on how to perform any task (without missing any steps!), you can also set a standard amount of time to each of those steps. When you do things the same way and in the same order every time, it should take you roughly the same amount of time each time you perform that task.

Then you can take your procedures and assign billable time to those tasks. This is a good way to bill your VA clients – instead of billing them by the hour you can charge them per task. That way the faster you get at something, doesn’t affect the revenue that you make to do it.

Who wants to get better at doing something and then make less money to do it? Not me!

4. Allows You to Bring in Help

When you have procedures that are set to your standards, and that you know are accurate, you can bring in help anytime you like. If you want to have subcontractors do work for you, you can provide them with the documented steps on how you want the task done, and you can tell them how long that task should take them to complete.

Procedures are very important when other Virtual Assistants are doing work for you. You have less to check when you know that they are doing things exactly the way you want them to. And you have better control over your expenses when you can tell them how long something should be taking them to complete (if they are having trouble adhering to your timing, have a conversation about it and make adjustments where necessary).

5. Helps You Take Time Off

Along the same line as getting help, you can actually take time off more easily when your business tasks are documented.

When you have your clients look after a couple of things (I always have my clients run customer payments as necessary if I’m out of the office long term), you can provide them with a detailed how-to so they can get things done. Or if you have another Virtual Assistant acting as backup for you, you can also provide your procedures to them and you will know that they are doing things the way you would if you were doing them.

So, what do you think?

As much as developing the actual procedures takes time and might seem like a boring or time-consuming task, it is really an important part of your business. It is helpful in many ways and it’s something you should really consider doing.

You can start slowly. Whatever you plan to do next, write it down as you go. Continue with the next task, and before you know it you’ll be on your way to a full fledged binder of procedures. Have fun!

For more tips on getting good business foundation in place, watch this video on Boundaries and Procedures on my YouTube channel. There are more than 50 free training videos for VAs there!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

5 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Virtual Assistant Business

Are you feeling unprepared to start your VA business? If so, you are not the only one.

We all started the same way. With no real knowledge of how it worked, and how we were supposed to get started. I did, too!

How you proceed with your Virtual Assistant business will determine whether you can succeed or whether you will fail.

There are many things that you need to consider when you are getting started or are growing, and you will make mistakes.

Identifying mistakes that can be easily fixed, or avoided all together, is what will help you get past the tough times and on the road to success.

Here are 5 mistakes that you should try to avoid (or fix!) in your Virtual Assistant business:

Learning New Skills to Get Started

Finding clients is hard enough when you first start out. Don't make it harder on yourself by spending money on something that you don't even know you can do or sell. You will need to get comfortable selling yourself to clients, which can be very difficult - and this will be made more challenging when you are trying to sell them something that you have no experience doing for clients yet. Training is great, when it is timed right. But you should never start your business trying to market and sell a brand new service or skill. You have admin experience. Start with what you know.

Charging Rates That Are Too Low

Recognizing our value is always a challenge as Virtual Assistants. We feel like what we do is not as valuable as what other people do. We struggle with selling our value to clients. And that translates to setting prices that are not high enough to sustain our business. When rates are set with intention (and by doing math!) and you know the value that you are providing the clients, they are probably going to be higher than you thought. But your business will thank you. Don't be afraid to set rates that earn you a profit and reflect your expertise.

Getting Stuck in the Research Phase

There is a lot to learn when you start a VA business. Probably more than you thought there would be. But many VAs get stuck in the research phase - looking for advice or simply Googling things and taking free trainings. I've seen VAs spend weeks on their logo and company name, or more than a year on their website. You need to get out of research phase and make a decision. Your business is a living, breathing thing - and it can (and will!) change. Your business name and logo are decisions. Your website should be simple. It will change. Don't let it hold you up. You need to get started to get clients, and you will never start if you keep researching. 

Never Saying No

Clients will ask you to do whatever they need. It is up to you to say yes to things you want to do. It is also up to you to say no to what you don't want to do. You are a business owner and the client does not get to decide what you do for them. If you have a client contract, it should include a scope of work that you discussed before starting to work together. If the task they request is not on that list, you can say no. Saying no is your right, and you need to exercise it so that you stay happy in your business. Your clients will be happy when you are clear, and you can always help them find someone else to do the tasks you don't want to do.

Not Setting Boundaries

Boundaries are a very big part of being a business owner and yet they are grossly overlooked, especially by Virtual Assistants. We are helpers by our nature as support professionals, and so saying no and setting boundaries can be difficult for us. But setting things like business hours or work time helps everyone know when you are working and when you are not - so that you can balance everything in your life. Just because you are at home doesn't mean you are available to everyone all the time. Set boundaries and be sure you follow them yourself. Again, clarity is the key, and it keeps everyone happy.

Are you currently doing any of these things?

Avoid these mistakes or fix them if they are part of your business right now.

I challenge you to identify what you are doing that could use a change.

Get help with something if you are having making the change yourself.

It's your business - and your health, and your life. Setting yourself up for long term success helps everyone around you. But especially you. You are worth it!

For more tips on how to take action and get moving, watch this free video: Take Action and Stop Making Excuses on my YouTube channel. There are more than 40 free training videos for VAs there!

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

3 Simple Ways to Get Clients for Your VA Business

If you are struggling to find Virtual Assistant clients, this article is for you!

When we start our Virtual Assistant business, most of us don't realize the work involved to get clients.

We meticulously launch our website, get business cards printed, and expect the clients to start calling. Or we expect to join job boards and fill our client roster easily.

That's not always the way it works. In fact, most of the time it's very different.

While writing blog posts and posting to social media is an important part of your marketing, it's not enough to get clients easily. Your posts need to have an audience - and that takes work to build.

To get clients for your business, you need to do outreach. You need to find your clients and connect with them.

Here are 3 simple ways you can reach out to people about your VA business:

Contact 100 People You Know

When you start talking to people about your business, the first place to begin is with who you know. Make a list of 100 people you know (it's okay if this list starts with your mom - mine does too!). Maybe not all of these people will be your clients, but they can certainly help to spread the word about what you are doing - provided that they understand what you do. You will see quickly that you know a lot of people. Once you have your list, start reaching out to them by email or by phone. Introduce your business, tell them exactly what kind of clients you offer services for, and ask them if they know anyone who might need your services.

Attend A Networking Event

Going to a networking event is a great place to find potential clients. Everyone is there for the same reason - to network with other business owners. Make sure when you choose an event to go to, you always have a goal of how many people you want to connect with. Often the local networking groups have Facebook groups where you can connect with the attendees before and after the event. When you network with a goal in mind, you will have much better results.

Find Strategic Partners

The connections you will make in your business are not always going to become your clients. Some of the best people you can connect with are strategic partners. These are people who can potentially refer business to you. Usually they are in contact with your audience or market, but they are not providing the same services as you. Your VA colleagues can be great strategic partners. If you don't provide the same services as a colleague, you can refer business back and forth to each other. When you make your list above, identify potential strategic partners on it and reach out to them as such.

Getting comfortable with outreach is going to be one of the best things you can do for your VA business. The more conversations you have with other business owners, the better you will get at it. And the more connections you make, the more potential clients and referrals you will have.

What are you doing for outreach in your business? If you are struggling to find clients and you are still hiding behind your computer, I challenge you to do these three simple things to see how it impacts your VA business.

For some more ideas on how to get clients for your VA business so that you get clients, read this blog post: Where Do I Find Clients for My VA Business?

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

Improve Your Marketing Strategy To Get More Virtual Assistant Clients

How do you feel about marketing? Does it make you feel stressed or anxious?

If it does, it's probably because you aren't getting clients easily from it.

As a VA, we need to do many types of marketing every day. The most important thing in our business is getting clients, and we need to put ourselves out there to do it.

In a perfect world, we would have clients find us and hire us, but that’s not how it works most of the time.

We need to show up in front of them when they need us.

Thankfully, it’s not as difficult as it sounds – all you need a is a good strategy that you implement consistently.

Here are a few simple tips to help you improve your marketing strategy:

1. Set up a marketing plan.

A marketing plan seems like a daunting task for some Virtual Assistants – because often planning ahead comes with insecurity. Forecasting is something that isn’t natural to us so it sometimes can be difficult to put stretch goals on paper.

But if you dial it back to just doing a marketing plan for the coming month that can bring it into a more manageable frame of mind. Short term marketing planning is a great thing to do, because it makes you think about it more often, and you can stay very close to the goal at hand. Decide what you what to do, and what the steps are that will get you to that goal. Then make sure everything you do points in the direction of that goal.

2. Be very clear on your client’s problems.

Many VAs talk about being a Virtual Assistant – in their networking and also in the marketing copy. While it’s very exciting for YOU to know how being a VA works, your clients are not really all that excited about it. What they need to hear you talk about is what you can do to help them in their business.

If you provide bookkeeping services, talk about common problems clients have, why they should work with someone to get their books done, and how you have helped other clients. Clients who are struggling with their bookkeeping will notice that message in your marketing far more than anything about being a VA. Focus on what their problems are and you will be putting the right message out there – and your clients will hear it loud and clear.

3. Market your business consistently.

If you are only thinking about your marketing when you are trying to find new clients, and you don’t do any when you are not, you will probably not do very well when you are in need of clients. It can be difficult to fit it in when you are busy – but it’s necessary to keep your name out there consistently.

Even if you aren’t looking for a client right now, what if your dream client comes along that is better than someone you are currently working with (maybe they pay more, or they work in an industry you love, or they have more consistent work)? You don’t want to miss working with them because you weren’t out there.

Figure out what you can do regularly and consistently and make a plan for the next 30 days to implement it.

Make sure your messaging is clear and focused entirely on your client’s problems – and your solutions for them.

That’s a marketing plan!

For more great info about marketing your VA business, check out this article on Getting Clients.

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

How do you feel about marketing? Does it make you feel stressed or anxious?

If it does, it's probably because you aren't getting clients easily from it.

As a VA, we need to do many types of marketing every day. The most important thing in our business is getting clients, and we need to put ourselves out there to do it.

In a perfect world, we would have clients find us and hire us, but that’s not how it works most of the time.

We need to show up in front of them when they need us.

Thankfully, it’s not as difficult as it sounds – all you need a is a good strategy that you implement consistently.

Here are a few simple tips to help you improve your marketing strategy:

1. Set up a marketing plan.

A marketing plan seems like a daunting task for some Virtual Assistants – because often planning ahead comes with insecurity. Forecasting is something that isn’t natural to us so it sometimes can be difficult to put stretch goals on paper.

But if you dial it back to just doing a marketing plan for the coming month that can bring it into a more manageable frame of mind. Short term marketing planning is a great thing to do, because it makes you think about it more often, and you can stay very close to the goal at hand. Decide what you what to do, and what the steps are that will get you to that goal. Then make sure everything you do points in the direction of that goal.

2. Be very clear on your client’s problems.

Many VAs talk about being a Virtual Assistant – in their networking and also in the marketing copy. While it’s very exciting for YOU to know how being a VA works, your clients are not really all that excited about it. What they need to hear you talk about is what you can do to help them in their business.

If you provide bookkeeping services, talk about common problems clients have, why they should work with someone to get their books done, and how you have helped other clients. Clients who are struggling with their bookkeeping will notice that message in your marketing far more than anything about being a VA. Focus on what their problems are and you will be putting the right message out there – and your clients will hear it loud and clear.

3. Market your business consistently.

If you are only thinking about your marketing when you are trying to find new clients, and you don’t do any when you are not, you will probably not do very well when you are in need of clients. It can be difficult to fit it in when you are busy – but it’s necessary to keep your name out there consistently.

Even if you aren’t looking for a client right now, what if your dream client comes along that is better than someone you are currently working with (maybe they pay more, or they work in an industry you love, or they have more consistent work)? You don’t want to miss working with them because you weren’t out there.

Figure out what you can do regularly and consistently and make a plan for the next 30 days to implement it.

Make sure your messaging is clear and focused entirely on your client’s problems – and your solutions for them.

That’s a marketing plan!

For more great info about marketing your VA business, check out this article on Getting Clients.

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here

Why Many Virtual Assistants Aren’t Blogging (But Should Be!)

The most common argument VAs have for not writing a regular blog post: I don’t know what to write!

You’ve got your Virtual Assistant website set up and you even have a blog!

It’s exciting but that excitement wears off really quickly for many VAs when they realize they have no idea what to write about.

Sometimes the first few posts come easily, but then the shine wears off and it becomes difficult to come up with ideas to post.

At least this is what Virtual Assistants tell me.

Who wants to read my blog?

How do I come up with new ideas all the time?

Why is blogging so hard for Virtual Assistants?

The main reason you get stuck is that you don’t have a plan.

The second reason you get stuck is that you really don’t know who you are writing to, or what you should be writing about.

Take a look at your blog. Do you write about being a VA? That’s not what your audience wants to read about. Unless you are helping others become VAs, that is.

But if you are providing services to clients for anything – that’s what you should be writing about.

VAs need to have a blog. And there are all kinds of things you can write about on it.

If you provide client care services, you should be writing about things that are related to that service. For instance, write about things like how to build long-term relationships with clients, how to reward customer loyalty, tips to onboard clients more easily, and so on.

If you provide WordPress services, write about everything WordPress-related. For instance, the latest plugins, new or improved themes, and tips to help you maintain your website (or how your VA can maintain it for you).

If you provide bookkeeping services, write about tracking expenses, filing and organizing tips and share info about other paperwork and admin resources that will help your clients do a better job in this area.

Get the idea?

Your blog topics have to be what your clients need to read about.

The blog posts should be written from your perspective, as the Virtual Assistant who can help them with those services or tasks.

You probably offer more than one service, so you can build your content from there. (Still stuck? Google your main service offering with the word ‘blogs’ and you’ll surely come up with some great examples you can model your content after).

The idea is that your content is for your clients and your potential clients. When you connect with someone in a networking situation, they will often check you out online. So your blog, if you have one, is an important place to showcase your expertise.

Come up with 3 or 4 main topics that you will write about – and then you still need to have a plan.

How often will you write? Once a week helps you to build a really good routine and habit. Less than that, and you might find yourself taking longer to do it or skipping it all together.

What kinds of posts will you write? You can write a variety of posts – conversational/advice like many of mine are, lists and how-tos, reviews of services you use, and more. Change it up and you will be keeping your blog fresh and interesting every time.

When will you write? Schedule time every week to do your writing and you will get a lot more done.

I belong to a writing support group – and it’s been great for me to be able to schedule time in my calendar to write ‘live’ with the help and support of our group facilitator, Kathy Colaiacovo. We come to the group with our article idea, get feedback on how to make it more appealing and SEO and keyword friendly, and then get (at least) the first draft done so we can finish it up and post it.

Learning to develop good writing habits, and writing regularly helps you to get better at it. When you nail your main topic areas it also makes it easy to find things to write about, and your audience will love it.

Start now. Pick four main topics to write about on your blog. Make sure they showcase your VA expertise, and will be interesting to your audience and potential clients. It’s easier than you think!

For some more ideas on what to write on your blog, check out this article: Five Ways to Find Great Blog Post Topics.

About the Author: Tracey D’Aviero is a Virtual Assistant Coach, Trainer, Speaker and Author. After operating a busy VA business of her own since 1996, Tracey began teaching others to run their VA businesses in 2010 through Your VA Mentor. In 2016 she purchased the CAVA and GAVA VA associations and now teaches and coaches VAs exclusively. She has a vast amount of experience working in a many different industries which helps her to offer her students and coaching clients a unique perspective and sound advice. She is a proud advocate of the Virtual Assistant industry. Learn more about Tracey’s journey in the VA industry here